Total Pageviews

Friday, June 3, 2011

La Estrategia del Camaleón





Monday, May 30, 2011

One Big Story

At a fundraising dinner for a school that serves children with learning disabilities, the father of one of the students delivered a speech that would never be forgotten by all who attended. After extolling the school and its

Dedicated staff, he offered a question:

'When not interfered with by outside influences, everything nature does, is done with perfection.

Yet my son, Shay, cannot learn things as other children do. He cannot understand things as other children do.


Where is the natural order of things in my son?'

 The audience was stilled by the query.

The father continued. 'I believe that when a child like Shay, who was mentally and physically disabled comes into the world, an opportunity to realize true human nature presents itself, and it comes in the way other people treat that child.'

Then he told the following story:

Shay and I had walked past a park where some boys Shay knew were playing baseball. Shay asked, 'Do you think they'll let me play?' I knew that most of the boys would not want someone like Shay on their team, but as a father Ialso understood that if my son were allowed to play, it would give him a much-needed sense of belonging and some confidence to be accepted by others in spite of his handicaps.

I approached one of the boys on the field and asked (not expecting much) if Shay could play. The boy looked around for guidance and said, 'We're losing by six runs and the game is in the eighth inning. I guess he can be on our team and we'll try to put him in to bat in the ninth inning..'

Shay struggled over to the team's bench and, with a broad smile, put on a team shirt.. I watched with a small tear in my eye and warmth in my heart. The boys saw my joy at my son being accepted.
 

In the bottom of the eighth inning, Shay's team scored a few runs but was still behind by three.

In the top of the ninth inning, Shay put on a glove and played in the right field. Even though no hits came his way, he was obviously ecstatic just to be in the game and on the field, grinning from ear to ear as I waved to him from the stands.

In the bottom of the ninth inning, Shay's team scored again.

Now, with two outs and the bases loaded, the potential winning run was on base and Shay was scheduled to be next at bat.

At this juncture, do they let Shay bat and give away their chance to win the game?

Surprisingly, Shay was given the bat. Everyone knew that a hit was all but impossible because Shay didn't even know how to hold the bat properly, much less connect with the ball.

However, as Shay stepped up to the plate, the pitcher, recognizing that the other team was putting winning aside for this moment in Shay's life, moved in a few steps to lob the ball in softly so Shay could at least make contact.

The first pitch came and Shay swung clumsily and missed.

The pitcher again took a few steps forward to toss the ball softly towards Shay.

As the pitch came in, Shay swung at the ball and hit a slow ground ball right back to the pitcher.

The game would now be over.

The pitcher picked up the soft grounder and could have easily thrown the ball to the first baseman.

Shay would have been out and that would have been the end of the game.


Instead, the pitcher threw the ball right over the first baseman's head, out of reach of all team mates.

Everyone from the stands and both teams started yelling, 'Shay, run to first!

Run to first!'

Never in his life had Shay ever run that far, but he made it to first base.

He scampered down the baseline, wide-eyed and startled.

Everyone yelled, 'Run to second, run to second!'

Catching his breath, Shay awkwardly ran towards second, gleaming and struggling to make it to the base.

By the time Shay rounded towards second base, the right fielder had the ball . The smallest guy on their team who now had his first chance to be the hero for his team.

He could have thrown the ball to the second-baseman for the tag, but he understood the pitcher's intentions so he, too, intentionally threw the ball high and far over the third-baseman's head.

Shay ran toward third base deliriously as the runners ahead of him circled the bases toward home.

All were screaming, 'Shay, Shay, Shay, all the Way Shay'

Shay reached third base because the opposing shortstop ran to help him by turning him in the direction of third base, and shouted, 'Run to third!

Shay, run to third!'

As Shay rounded third, the boys from both teams, and the spectators, were on their feet screaming, 'Shay, run home! Run home!'

Shay ran to home, stepped on the plate, and was cheered as the hero who hit the grand slam and won the game for his team

'That day', said the father softly with tears now rolling down his face, 'the boys from both teams helped bring a piece of true love and humanity into this world'.

Shay didn't make it to another summer. He died that winter, having never forgotten being the hero and making me so happy, and coming home and seeing his Mother tearfully embrace her little hero of the day!

AND NOW A LITTLE FOOT NOTE TO THIS STORY:

We all send thousands of jokes through the e-mail without a second thought, but when it comes to sending messages about life choices, people hesitate.

The crude, vulgar, and often obscene pass freely through cyberspace, but public discussion about decency is too often suppressed in our schools and workplaces.

If you're thinking about forwarding this message, chances are that you're probably sorting out the people in your address book who aren't the 'appropriate' ones to receive this type of message Well, the person who sent you this believes that we all can make a difference.

We all have thousands of opportunities every single day to help realize the 'natural order of things.'

So many seemingly trivial interactions between two people present us with a choice:

Do we pass along a little spark of love and humanity or do we pass up those opportunities and leave the world a little bit colder in the process

A wise man once said every society is judged by how it treats it's least fortunate amongst them.

Sunday, May 29, 2011

Sé que he vivido mucho

Mientras leía el pensamiento de Gerge Carlin que dice que la vida no se mide por el número de alientos que hemos tomado, sino por los momentos en que se nos quita la respiración....comenzé a pensar que debo de haber vivido mucho, porque para bien y para mal, se me ha quitado la respiración varias veces.
Se me quitó la respiración el día que hice mi Primera Comunión, hace "miles de años" y creí en el momento que recibí la hostia, que el éxtasis que me produjo mi sentimiento de comunicación personal con Dios era tan fuerte, que no podía respirar.  Se me volvió a quitar la respiración otra vez, el día que recibí el primer beso y sentí le intensidad de un amor.  Sentí la misma sensación cuando frente al altar juré amar y respetar a mi compañero de toda la vida. Casi me ahogo de la emoción cuando sentí la sensación de ser madre por primera vez y sentir que éramos autores de una vida nueva.  Y siguió siendo así cuando nacieron los otros dos hijos que tuve.  Se me quitó la respiración cuando ví a mis hijos dar sus primeros pasos y poder hablar y decirme que me querían. Perdí aliento cuando cada uno de ellos se graduó de colegios y universidades...cuando uno de ellos me anunció que se había registrado en las filas militares...y el día que lo mandaron a la guerra, después de todo el esfuerzo que habíamos hecho para que construyera su vida y no se metiera en la posibilidad de destruirla.  Lo volví a perder, cuando vi al segundo finalmente graduarse y cada vez que el triunfaba y hacía esfuerzos superiores para superarse y ser aceptado en los más altos rangos de puestos de trabajo y universidades...y también cuando el tercero finalmente se graduó y rápidamente encontró un trabajo que le permitiría quedarse viviendo conmigo...que se quedaría en nuestro pueblo.
Me sorprendí y se me quitó el aliento al ver mis primeras arrugas y al olvidarme de teñirme el pelo y ver mi cabeza casi toda blanca.  O aquellas veces que ví mis carnes fláccidas o no pude seguir los pasos de la clase de zumba, cuando me creía una verdadera maestra del baile.
Fue una tristísima experiencia que me hizo perder la respiración el día que mi hijo se casó y ví esa mirada especial con la que miraba a su esposa.  Tiempo después, la perdí de nuevo cuando terminaron su relación con la misma rapidez con la que la comenzaron, y casi me ahogo cuando me dijo que sería padre...en estas circumstancias.  Después, me convertí en abuela y me faltó la respiración el día que ví a mi nietecita de tres meses dormir en mis brazos cuando su madre me la trajo tan generosamente para que la conociera. Y se repitió la sensación al ver la ternura de mi hijo cuando cargó por primera vez a su hijita, como si al menor movimiento torpe se le pudiera deslizar de sus brazos.  El sufrimiento e impotencia de mis hijos muchas veces me hizo sentir sensaciones de desmayo...y más cuando uno de mis hijos me acusó de sus fracasos, porque no tenía adonde voltear para designar a un culpable...y me morí mil veces cuando me sacó de su vida con la misma facilidad como cuando una persona eructa un gas fastidioso. Al ver los progresos de mi nietecita: desde su primer aliento, pasando por la primera vez que pudo sentarse, que le crecieron sus primeros dientes, que aprendió a encaramarse en su coche de muñecas adaptado a andador y dio sus primeros pasos, hasta que se soltó el mismo día que cumplió un añito, que dijo sus primeras palabritas lindando los dos años, y siguió y sigue creciendo, que la oí cantar en perfecto entonamiento y nos dijo que nos quería y puso su cabecita sobre nuestras piernas y nos abrazó, volví a perder la respiración, porque me dí cuenta que por más que pase la vida, a través de ella y de su carita, nunca perderé el cariño de mi hijo...y si no lo veo a él, lo seguiré viendo a través de ella...hasta que se dé cuenta que las puertas seguirán siempre abiertas...gracias también a una generosidad sin linderos de una mujer que sabe como yo, que la maternidad nos transforma y nos hace valerosas y nos hace perder el miedo y nos llena de tanto amor, que lo queremos compartir.  Ahora sé que he vivido...mucho...mucho.

La Paradoja de Nuestro Tiempo

Un Mensaje por George Carlin:

La paradoja de nuestro tiempo en la historia es que tenemos edificios más altos pero los genios más cortos, Autopistas más anchas, pero los puntos de vista más estrechos. Gastamos más, pero tenemos menos, compramos más, pero disfrutamos de menos. Tenemos las casas más grandes y las familias más pequeñas, más conveniencias, pero menos tiempo. Tenemos más grados de escolaridad pero menos sentido, más conocimiento, pero menos juicio, más expertos, mas aun hay más problemas, más medicina, pero menos bienestar.
Bebemos demasiado, fumamos demasiado, gasta también descuidadamente, nos reimos muy poco, conducimos demasiado rápido, seguimos mucho tiempo enojados, nos acostamos demasiado tarde, nos levantamos demasiado cansados, leemos muy poco, veemos mucha tv, y oramos también rara vez.
Hemos multiplicado nuestras posesiones, pero reducido nuestros valores. Hablamos demasiado, amamos también rara vez, y odiamos con demasiada frecuencia.
Hemos aprendido a cómo ganarse la vida, pero no una vida. Hemos agregado años a la vida no vida a años. Hemos ido a la luna y de regreso, pero tenemos el problema que cruzar la calle para encontrar a un nuevo vecino. Conquistamos espacio sideral pero el espacio no interior. Hemos hecho las cosas más grandes, pero no mejor las cosas.
Hemos limpiado el aire, pero contaminado el alma. Hemos conquistado el átomo, pero no nuestro prejuicio. Escribimos más, pero aprendemos menos. Planeamos más, pero logramos menos. Hemos aprendido a apresurarse, pero no a esperar. Construimos más computadoras para tener más información, para producir más copias que nunca, pero nos comunicamos cada vez menos.
Estos son los tiempos de comida rápida y digestión lenta, hombres grandes y carácter pequeño, sumen las ganancias y las relaciones superficiales. Estos son los días de dos ingresos pero de más divorcio, las casas mas arregladas, pero las familias divididas. Estos son días de viajes rápidos, de pañales para tirar, de la moral del desecho, de una mesitas de noche, de los cuerpos de peso excesivo, y de las píldoras que hacen todo de viva, para calmarse, matar. Es un tiempo cuando hay mucho en la ventana de la sala de exposición y nada en el almacén. Un tiempo cuando la tecnología le puede traer esta carta a usted, y a un tiempo cuando usted puede elegir o compartir esta penetración, o para golpear justo borra…
Recuerde; gaste algún tiempo con sus seres queridos, porque ellos no serán alrededor para siempre.
Recuerde, diga una palabra amable a alguien que te admira, porque esa persona pequeña pronto crecerá y dejará su lado.
Recuerde, para dar un abrazo fuerte a la persona de a lado, porque eso es los únicos tesoros que usted puede dar con el corazón y que no cuesta un centavo.
Recuerde, para decir, “te quiero” a su compañero y tus seres queridos, pero sobre todo lo significa. Un beso y un abrazo repararán la herida cuando viene de lo profundo dentro de usted.
Recuerde de agarrarse las manos y adorar el momento para algún día esa persona no estará allí otra vez.
¡Dé tiempo para amar, da tiempo de hablar! Y da tiempo de compartir los pensamientos preciosos en su mente.
Y SIEMPRE RECUERDA:
La vida no es medida por el número de alientos que tomamos, sino por los momentos que quitan la respiración.
…….
(versión original en inglés. traducida
 por alanglz en 12 abril 2008.)